Monday, July 12, 2021

NBA Finals: Are the Suns equipped to handle their latest playoff adversity vs. Bucks?

 Why Booker-Ayton are not the next Shaq-Kobe (and why that's a good thing)

MILWAUKEE – Just over a minute before the Phoenix Suns walked off the court in defeat, they heard from up above what awaits them.

“Bucks in six!!,” the sell-out crowd of 16,637 yelled at Fiserv Forum. “Bucks in six!!!”

The Milwaukee Bucks were about to complete a 120-100 win over the Suns on Sunday in Game 3 of the NBA Finals. The fans in the upper deck expressed their belief that this win meant more than just reducing the Suns’ lead to 2-1. It gave them optimism about the Bucks’ fortunes in Game 4 here on Wednesday and beyond.

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Moments later in the postgame interview room, however, the Suns appeared intent on becoming a buzz-kill for those optimistic, giddy Bucks fans.

“This team is not going to give in,” Suns guard Devin Booker said. “They're going to keep playing all the way through. So we have to bring that same effort that we had in the first two games, and I think we'll be in good shape.”

Devin Booker holding a basketball: Devin Booker (1) had trouble on the offensive end in Game 3, scoring just 11 points.© Jeff Hanisch, USA TODAY Sports Devin Booker (1) had trouble on the offensive end in Game 3, scoring just 11 points.

The reason for the Suns’ optimism?

The Suns did not advance to the NBA Finals just because they had a regular-season MVP candidate (Chris Paul), an emerging All-Star (Booker) and a rising center (Deandre Ayton). Phoenix’s playoff journey has entailed navigating some potentially disruptive roadblocks.

After facing a 2-1 first-round series deficit to the Los Angeles Lakers, the Suns closed the series out in six games. After failing to eliminate the L.A. Clippers in Game 5 of the Western Conference Finals, the Suns dominated in a decisive Game 6.

More encouraging news? Never have the Suns lost in Game 4 during their latest postseason run, a game often seen as the most significant into determining a series outcome. The Suns have also had the NBA’s best road record during the regular season (24-12) and have collected two road wins against every playoff opponent.

“We know that we have to play with an unreal amount of aggression and energy for 48 minutes,” Suns coach Monty Williams said. “That's the deal. All of our guys know that we didn't [in Game 3]. We have had this happen to us before in the playoffs, and so I expect our guys to bounce back.”

The Suns have the track record to back up those words. But does that track record offer enough context to their latest challenge?

After the Suns faced a 2-1 series deficit to the Lakers, it appeared the defending champions were on the verge of handing the Suns an early first-round exit. Paul had experienced pain in his right shoulder. Booker and Jae Crowder captured the Suns’ emotional frustrations after each collecting flagrant fouls toward the end of Game 3. And Lakers stars LeBron James and Anthony Davis showed they could thrive through their respective injuries.

Devin Booker holding a basketball: Suns guard Devin Booker (1) passes while being guarded by Bucks guard Jrue Holiday (21) during game three of the 2021 NBA Finals at Fiserv Forum.© Mark J. Rebilas, USA TODAY Sports Suns guard Devin Booker (1) passes while being guarded by Bucks guard Jrue Holiday (21) during game three of the 2021 NBA Finals at Fiserv Forum.

Paul’s shoulder improved. James and Davis regressed physically. The Suns talked out their emotions and determined to stay resilient.

The Suns vowed to do the same thing after failing to deliver a close-out Game 5 win against the Clippers. Paul showed rust after missing the first two games after testing positive for COVID-19. Booker dealt with a shooting slump after playing with and without a mask to protect his battered nose. And Clippers forward Paul George had a signature playoff performance after fielding scrutiny all season for last year’s postseason failures.

Things changed in Game 6. The Clippers became increasingly fatigued. Paul delivered a signature 41-point performance. And Booker played more effectively with his mask.

The Suns face different circumstances against Milwaukee, both for better and for worse. The Suns consider it unlikely that Booker will duplicate his Game 3 shooting performance (3-of-14 shooting). But the Suns expressed the challenge with keeping Ayton out of foul trouble (five) because of the Bucks’ aggressiveness and the Suns’ depleted front-court depth. Phoenix lost center Dario Saric for the playoffs because of a torn ACL in his right knee.

Deandre Ayton (right) fouls Giannis Antetokounmpo in the second half of Game 3. Ayton was limited to just 24 minutes because of foul trouble.© Justin Casterline, Getty Images Deandre Ayton (right) fouls Giannis Antetokounmpo in the second half of Game 3. Ayton was limited to just 24 minutes because of foul trouble.

Meanwhile, the Bucks have shown more upside as the series has progressed. Bucks star Giannis Antetokounmpo has increased his dominance from Game 1 (20 points, 17 rebounds) to Game 2 (42 points, 12 rebounds) and Game 3 (41 points, 13 rebounds) after missing Games  5 and 6 of the Eastern Conference Finals against the Atlanta Hawks because of a hyperextended left knee. After shooting a combined 11-of-35 in Games 1 and 2, Jrue Holiday had 21 points on 8-of-14 shooting in Game 3.  

And yet…

“We have enough bodies to get that job done,” Crowder said. “We just got to do it collectively, and just be better individually. But we got enough bodies to get it done.”

That is because the Suns believe their success go beyond matching the Bucks’ depth or using their small-ball lineups outside of Ayton to make up for its lack of size. It also traces back to their mindset.

MARKED FOR GREATNESS: NBA Finals: How Suns’ Deandre Ayton and former player Mychal Thompson share special bond as native Bahamians

SHOOTING TROUBLE: NBA Finals: Suns done in by Devin Booker’s shooting woes, Deandre Ayton’s foul trouble in Game 3 loss to Bucks

Following both wins and losses, the Suns have still held film sessions and gym workouts that helped them scrutinize mistakes and highlight achievements without making a big deal of either development.

Therefore, it does not seem surprising the Suns have opted just to stay in the team hotel here in between games and practices. Not only have the Suns wanted to safeguard themselves during the pandemic. They also did not want to become exposed to the culinary temptations that could satisfy their tastebuds while disrupting their digestive system.

“You don't want to go outside of your comfort zone in a sense of just trying to get food and have to deal with food poisoning or whatnot,” Crowder said. “We are in enemy territory right now, and that’s not to say anything bad about Milwaukee. I love Milwaukee, but you never know. We wanted to take that out of anyone else's hand and be as locked in as possible and take care of our bodies and get ready.”

So when the Suns heard the Bucks fans declaring the home team would win in six games, they did not sense an ominous warning. They sensed an opportunity to shut up the noise.

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This article originally appeared on USA TODAY: NBA Finals: Are the Suns equipped to handle their latest playoff adversity vs. Bucks?

The Only Way for the U.S. to Reach Herd Immunity Is With COVID-19 Vaccine Mandates

The Only Way for the U.S. to Reach Herd Immunity Is With COVID-19 Vaccine Mandates

An attendee receives a dose of the Johnson & Johnson Janssen Covid-19 vaccine during an Atlanta Braves baseball game at Truist Park in Atlanta, Georgia, U.S., on Friday, May 7, 2021. The Atlanta Braves will be providing free COVID-19 vaccinations for fans during their games Friday and Saturday against the Philadelphia Phillies.© Elijah Nouvelage/Bloomberg An attendee receives a dose of the Johnson & Johnson Janssen Covid-19 vaccine during an Atlanta Braves baseball game at Truist Park in Atlanta, Georgia, U.S., on Friday, May 7, 2021. The Atlanta Braves will be providing free COVID-19 vaccinations for fans during their games Friday and Saturday against the Philadelphia Phillies.

To encourage more people to get a COVID-19 vaccine and reach herd immunity, U.S. government leaders and their corporate partners are now dangling many carrots to hesitant Americans. Free childcare, free car rides, even free beer has been offered. But new evidence is emerging in places like Ohio where, after state health authorities set up a lottery offering millions of dollars to people who got the jab, vaccination rates flatlined after an initial bump.

According to our analysis of Ipsos polling, such incentives won’t persuade about a quarter of American adults. And according to the most recent data, Americans—independent of their vaccination status—report phasing out many of the public health precautions they took over the previous 18 months.

Rather than carrots, reaching herd immunity is likely to require the use of sticks: vaccine mandates.

Health officials have left mandates as a last resort to be employed when all who might be persuaded have been vaccinated. But more than half of unvaccinated Americans say they would not get a vaccination if it were readily available to them. And problematically, our polling shows that the choices of those who remain unvaccinated may create enduring risks to public health, which could expedite the spread of mandates in order to secure places like universities, hospitals, and restaurants. This only becomes more urgent with the rise of the more transmissible Delta variant, which has spread to almost every state in the U.S.

Americans who say they do not intend to get vaccinated and those who plan to get vaccinated but have yet to do so are more likely to engage in “risky” activities this summer than people who are already vaccinated.

Perhaps more problematically, these unvaccinated adults are much less likely to wear masks and maintain a safe distance from others compared with people who have already been vaccinated.

This matters because the risk of COVID-19 infections among everyone—even the vaccinated—is dependent on the level of COVID-19 spread in a community. Epidemiologists believe that herd immunity will require between 75 and 85 percent of Americans to be vaccinated. There also remains some uncertainty about the vulnerability of children under the age of 12, who currently cannot be vaccinated.

When the U.S. Centers for Disease Control (CDC) announced on May 13th that Americans fully vaccinated against COVID-19 no longer need to wear masks or physically distance themselves in most indoor and outdoor places, the reversal was based on numerous scientific findings that vaccines would provide enduring protection. However, because “breakthrough” infections depend on how much virus is circulating in a community, the CDC also asked the unvaccinated to take precautions to protect their own health and the health of others.

The new Ipsos data suggest that the unvaccinated are unlikely to hold up their end of the bargain, unless they are compelled to do so.

Unvaccinated adults say they are actually more likely to dine at restaurants, go to movie theaters, attend a sporting event, go to an indoor concert, use a ridesharing service, and go on a cruise this summer—all activities that pose elevated risks of transmission because of close contact with other people.

Despite the risk of contraction and transmission, the unvaccinated are less likely to wear a mask. They are also less likely to say that they have practiced social distancing in the last week.

Of course, this is a mismatch of practices. Those Americans who can now afford to relax the precautions they have taken for 16 months are hesitant to do so, and those who should maintain such precautions say they will not.

As more Americans become vaccinated and since the new CDC guidelines were released, more vaccinated adults have begun to feel comfortable resuming activities previously thought to be too risky and reducing the health precautions they once took. However, polling data suggests that Americans uninterested in the vaccines were less likely to take precautions before they became available anyway, and they are no more likely to do so now.

© Provided by Meredith Corporation

Numerous studies have shown that this population is disproportionately less educated, lower income, rural, younger, Republican, and supportive of former President Donald Trump—who seeded significant distrust in public health authorities and scientists while in the White House. However, those uninterested in the vaccine already had lower levels of trust in the government and in the vaccine in late 2020 and early 2021, when Trump was still in power. So their behavior is less a reflection of recklessness than it is a result of sustained doubt in the severity of the pandemic and the prescribed actions of government authorities.

   

Encouragement from the White House—or their preferred beer brewery—is unlikely to move them.

In fact, the U.S.—which innovated several of the world’s most effective vaccines—features among the world’s most skeptical populations. In an Ipsos study of 15 of the world’s largest economies, only Russia features a smaller share of the unvaccinated population who plan to get the jab. U.S. vaccination rates were recently leapfrogged by numerous countries who received delayed access to the medicine.

chart© Provided by Meredith Corporation

Once incentives run their course, mandates may be all government institutions and businesses have left at their disposal to end the pandemic in the U.S. The Biden Administration was previously considering issuing a mask-wearing mandate for workplaces, but it is unlikely that the federal government will issue any nationwide mandates for masks or vaccinations. Instead, many businesses and other entities have already started conditioning returns to workplaces and campuses on proof of vaccination.

If the U.S. is to reach herd immunity, the polling suggests they are right to do so. 

New infections rising almost 50% across US; FDA may issue warning on J&J vaccine, report says: Live COVID-19 updates

 

New infections rising almost 50% across US; FDA may issue warning on J&J vaccine, report says: Live COVID-19 updates

COVID booster shots: here's why we may need one in the future

The U.S. averaged 19,455 new COVID-19 cases per day over the last seven days, a 47.5% increase from the previous week, according to data from Johns Hopkins University. And 43 states saw an increase in cases last week from the week before, a sign that the pandemic endures in the United States.

a hand holding a remote control: A doctor fills a syringe with the Johnson & Johnson COVID-19 vaccine at a vaccination center in Kabul, Afghanistan, Sunday, July 11, 2021. The COVID-19 vaccines were donated by the United States and delivered through the U.N.-backed COVAX program. Another shipment is expected to arrive later this month. (AP Photo/Rahmat Gul)© Rahmat Gul, AP A doctor fills a syringe with the Johnson & Johnson COVID-19 vaccine at a vaccination center in Kabul, Afghanistan, Sunday, July 11, 2021. The COVID-19 vaccines were donated by the United States and delivered through the U.N.-backed COVAX program. Another shipment is expected to arrive later this month. (AP Photo/Rahmat Gul)

Hospitalizations are rising again. Deaths, a lagging indicator, also appear ready to start climbing. More than 99% of deaths are now among people who have not been vaccinated, the Center for Disease Control and Prevention reports. 

Dr. Jennifer Nuzzo, with the Johns Hopkins Center for Health Security, says two-thirds of counties with sustained increases in new infections are in states with low vaccine coverage.

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"But the fact that we are seeing case increases in counties even in higher vaccination states is worrisome," she tweeted. "Anywhere there are pockets of low vax coverage is at risk!"

Also in the news:

►Japan Prime Minister Yoshihide Suga on Monday ordered a COVID-19 state of emergency for Tokyo. The plan aims to contain a resurgence in coronavirus infections and curb the movement of people during the Olympics, which run July 23 to Aug 8.

►Jim Nobles, Minnesota’s independent legislative auditor, says he doesn’t have the resources to satisfy a request by lawmakers for a comprehensive study of the state’s COVID-19 response. Democrats have criticized the request as political.

►Dutch Prime Minister Mark Rutte apologized Monday for what he called “an error of judgment” in relaxing the Netherlands’ coronavirus lockdown, a move that has led to a sharp surge in infections. Rutte has reintroduced some measures to rein in the virus’ spread.

►The chairman of the Miami-Dade County Commission has tested positive for the coronavirus, about four months after he was fully vaccinated. Jose Diaz has been a frequent presence at the Surfside condo collapse site, raising questions about exposure at the site, reported the Miami Herald.

đŸ“ˆ Today's numbers: The U.S. has had more than 33.8 million confirmed COVID-19 cases and more than 607,100 deaths, according to Johns Hopkins University data. The global totals: more than 186.9 million cases and more than 4 million deaths. Nearly 159.2 million Americans – 48% of the population – have been fully vaccinated, according to the CDC.

đŸ“˜ What we're reading: As many adolescents and young adults prepare to return to the classroom in the fall term amid the spread of the delta variant, the lagging vaccination rates among Generation Z are raising concerns among experts.

Keep refreshing this page for the latest news. Want more? Sign up for USA TODAY's Coronavirus Watch newsletter to receive updates directly to your inbox and join our Facebook group.

FDA to warn about possible link between J&J shot and autoimmune disorder, report says

The Johnson & Johnson coronavirus vaccine is once again raising concerns.

The Food and Drug Administration is planning to issue a warning about a possible link between that vaccine and the autoimmune disorder known as Guillain-BarrĂ© syndrome, the Washington Post reported.

There have been about 100 instances of the possible connection between the vaccine and the syndrome, mostly among men and in many cases among those age 50 and older, the newspaper said, adding that 12.8 million doses of the J&J shot have been administered.

The CDC says on its website that people who have had Guillain-Barré Syndrome can be vaccinated against COVID, and that no cases of the disorder were reported in clinical trials for the Pfizer and Moderna vaccines. One case was reported in J&J trials.

Use of the J&J vaccine, hailed for its single-shot convenience, was paused for 10 days in April while federal health agencies investigated reports of six women developing rare but severe blood clots within two weeks of receiving the jab. The agencies later determined the vaccine's benefits outweigh its risks.

Rash of summer camp outbreaks could be a harbinger for school year

Recent outbreaks of COVID-19 at summer camps in Texas, Illinois, Florida, Missouri and Kansas, some spreading into communities, have some wondering whether it could be a preview of what may happen in the upcoming school year as the U.S. grapples with another surge in coronavirus infections.

In the Houston area, more than 130 youth and adults tested positive for the virus in connection to a church camp. “In some cases, entire families are sick,” pastor Bruce Wesley of Clear Creek Community Church said on Facebook.

In Illinois, health officials said 85 teens and adults at a Christian youth camp in mid-June tested positive. In Kansas, about 50 people were infected in an outbreak linked to a church summer camp last month not far from Wichita.

JoAnn Martin, administrator of the public health agency in Pettis County, Missouri, near where another summer camp outbreak took place, lamented the difficulty in getting people to take the virus seriously and get vaccinated.

“It has been a challenge since the first case,” she said. “You have people who still say it is not real. You have people who say it is a cold. You have people who say what is the big deal. You have people who say it is all a government plot.”

Urban Missouri hospital battles surge sweeping rural communities

Mercy Hospital in Springfield, Missouri, has opened its sixth COVID-19 ward as the delta variant rages in the state’s southwest region. Chief Administrative Officer Erik Frederick tweeted that the hospital needed at most five COVID-19 wards last year, when the coronavirus was peaking across the nation. The hospital was treating 133 virus patients as of Sunday.

“Many local rural communities don’t have high vaccination rates,” Frederick wrote. “They also don’t have a hospital. Get sick, come to Springfield. I think that’s getting left out of the narrative.”

Pfizer, health officials to discuss vaccine booster shots

Representatives from Pfizer and federal health officials, who sent out conflicting signals about the need for vaccine booster shots, are planning to meet as soon as today. Last week, the American pharmaceutical giant and its partner BioNTech said they would pursue U.S. and European regulatory approval for a third dose of their COVID-19 vaccine, given the spread of variants and data they said showed diminished vaccine potency six months after the initial shots. U.S. officials, however, say they want to see the data before recommending booster shots. 

The issue is complicated by vaccine hesitancy in the U.S. – and the fact that much of the world hasn't obtained access to first shots of vaccine.

"Right now, given the data that the CDC and the FDA has, they don't feel that we need to tell people right now you need to be boosted," Dr. Anthony Fauci, a top Biden administration adviser, said Sunday on CNN in response to the news.

California to require face masks at schools this fall, diverging from CDC

California will require that masks be worn at schools when classrooms open this fall, despite new guidance issued Friday from the CDC that says vaccinated teachers and students don’t need to wear face coverings inside school buildings.

Ahead of new school guidelines expected next week, health officials in California said Friday that requiring face coverings will allow all schools to reopen this fall for full in-person instruction. California Health and Human Services Secretary Dr. Mark Ghaly said that not all schools can accommodate physical distancing of at least 3 feet or more, so the best preventive measure is wearing masks indoors.

“We believe that with masking and with testing, we can get kids back to in-person 100% in our schools,” Ghaly said.

Ghaly noted the CDC guidance released Friday says that when it is not possible to maintain at least 3 feet of physical distance, “it is especially important to layer multiple other prevention strategies, such as indoor masking.”

California’s decision around schools comes as districts across the state prepare to open next month for full-time learning and the state continues to encourage residents, including kids as young as 12 years old, to get vaccinated.

– Stockton Record

Bonus pay for essential workers varied widely across states

For putting their health on the line during the coronavirus pandemic, prison guards in Missouri got an extra $250 per paycheck. Teachers in Georgia received $1,000 bonuses. And in Vermont, nurses, janitors, retail workers and many others got as much as $2,000.

Over the past year, about one-third of U.S. states have used federal COVID-19 relief aid to reward workers considered essential who dutifully reported to jobs during the pandemic. But who qualified for those bonuses – and how much they received – varied widely, according to an Associated Press review. While some were paid thousands of dollars, others with similar jobs elsewhere received nothing.

As society reopens, momentum to provide pandemic hazard pay appears to be fading – even though the federal government has broadened the ability of state and local governments to provide retroactive pay under a $350 billion aid package enacted by President Joe Biden in March.

So far, only a few states have committed to paying workers extra with money from the American Rescue Plan.

Contributing: Mike Stucka, USA TODAY; The Associated Press.

This article originally appeared on USA TODAY: New infections rising almost 50% across US; FDA may issue warning on J&J vaccine, report says: Live COVID-19 updates

Newsmax viewers are nearly twice as likely to refuse the vaccine than Fox News watchers, new poll finds

 

Newsmax viewers are nearly twice as likely to refuse the vaccine than Fox News watchers, new poll finds

  • A recent survey on news consumption found differences in vaccine hesitancy among conservatives.
  • Newsmax and OAN viewers were twice as likely as Fox News's audience to refuse the COVID-19 vaccine.
  • Vaccine hesitancy remains a major challenge to the Biden administration.
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    A recent survey on how news consumption affects policy views found that Fox News viewers are much less vaccine hesitant than those who tune into further right-wing cable channels Newsmax and One America News Network (OAN).

    In a summary of the findings from the Public Religion Research Institute published on the data news site FiveThirtyEight, a shifting landscape in conservative media emerged as a possible explanation for the disparity.

    It also showed how news consumption correlates with not just vaccine hesitancy — one of the biggest issues facing the Biden administration in its efforts to bring the US fully out of the pandemic — but also belief in QAnon conspiracy theories and the "Big Lie" that the 2020 election was stolen.

    For Republicans who identified as getting most of their news from Fox, 54% said they've either already taken the COVID-19 vaccine or plan to get it as soon as possible. Just 32% of GOP Newsmax and OAN viewers said the same.

    As for those who said they would refuse the vaccine, 16% of Fox watchers said they would compared to 32% for Newsmax and OAN.

    In the FiveThirtyEight write up of the study, Public Religion Research Institute Director Natalie Jackson cautioned that while the survey found news consumption habits and vaccine views to be correlated, tuning into Newsmax or OAN instead of Fox does not necessarily cause someone to be more vaccine hesitant.

    Drawing on the institute's past surveys and ones from other pollsters in the space, Jackson explained how Fox News is no longer the consensus choice for conservative respondents with the most extreme views.

    The institute's polling found a shift that began in the aftermath of the 2020 election, when Newsmax and OAN were much more willing to run with former President Donald Trump's lies about it being stolen than most Fox News hosts were.

    Jackson touched on the complicated realignment in conservative media and how the difference between the two audiences on vaccine hesitancy was replicated in views on QAnon and the "Big Lie."

    "We don't yet know whether Republicans are choosing their different media sources based on preexisting views, or whether the media sources are actively shaping those views," Jackson writes. "It's likely that both forces are at play. But what we do know is that far-right news sources are attracting a small but growing proportion of Republicans — many of whom either already held or developed extreme views — while Fox News, once the go-to source for many on the fringe of the party, may no longer be a hotbed for some of the GOP's most extreme beliefs."

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    Kim Kardashian Promotes Kendall Jenner’s 818 Tequila In A Skimpy Green Bikini

     

    Kim Kardashian Promotes Kendall Jenner’s 818 Tequila In A Skimpy Green Bikini

    Kim Kardashian was back in another bikini, and her followers on Instagram have been loving the sight. The Keeping Up With The Kardashians star shared four snaps to her feed on Monday morning, and it has been attracting a ton of attention in the short time since it went live.

    The beauty mogul showed off her killer body in scanty swimwear while promoting her sister Kendall Jenner’s 818 Tequila. Check out the photos below.

    Basking In The Sun

    Kim Kardashian delights her followers with several new bikini photos

    Kim Kardashian said last month that she was 'in the best shape of my life' thanks to a low carb, vegetarian diet and workouts with trainer Melissa Alcantara.

    And the 40-year-old siren - who has been single since splitting from Kanye West in March - seems dedicated to showing off her slim frame on Instagram as she frequently poses in teeny bikinis.

    On Monday morning the Keeping Up With The Kardashians vet was at it again as she posted several images where she made the most of a little green two piece bathing suit while in an outdoor setting as she posed with a bottle of tequila and a can of hard seltzer.

    Hot stuff: Kim Kardashian said last month that she was 'in the best shape of my life.' And the siren seems dedicated to showing off her slim frame on Instagram as she frequently poses in teeny bikinis. On Monday morning the Keeping Up With The Kardashians vet was at it again

    Hot stuff: Kim Kardashian said last month that she was 'in the best shape of my life.' And the siren seems dedicated to showing off her slim frame on Instagram as she frequently poses in teeny bikinis. On Monday morning the Keeping Up With The Kardashians vet was at it again

    The star was nearly falling out of her top as she posed away by mature trees and then on the grass of her most recent vacation destination.

    The briefs came high on the hips and showed off her lean, toned legs thanks to daily visits on her treadmill and StairMaster.

    Her hair was worn down in soft waves as she had a 818 trucker hat perched atop her head: 818 is the tequila brand from her sister Kendall Jenner.

    The cap said Kenny's Tequila Delivery 818 and had a photo of a cactus plant. 

    Kim Kardashian is seen wearing a black bikini under a pattern coverup in Miami Beach

    Kim Kardashian is seen wearing a black bikini under a pattern coverup in Miami Beach

    MEGA

    Kim was photographed in a place that looked like a forest. In the first photo, she stood in the middle of the frame with her hip popped to the side and legs apart. She was holding a canned beverage with her right hand while she raised her other hand to the back of her head as she looked straight into the lens with her head slightly tilted.

    In the second snap, she could be seen lying on the grass while holding a bottle of 818 Tequila. She lifted her head from the ground while gazing at the photographer. Despite a cap, she was still squinting from the bright sunlight. A swipe to the right featured Kim still lounging on the ground with her figure turned at a slight angle, giving viewers a peek at her perky buns. The mother of four was touching her headwear as she embraced the heat of the sun.

    Related to what you're reading: Body Of A GoddessKim Kardashian Stepping Out in NYC

    Kim Kardashian Stepping Out in NYC

    MEGA

    The photographer moved a few steps back in the next pic to get a better shot of Kim’s body. The Skim founder was lying on her back on the grass with her knees bent as she held onto the alcoholic beverage. She flashed a bright smile, looking like she was happy and content with her day. The last picture in the series showed a closer look at Kim’s hourglass figure. This time, she sat upright, and although her face was cut off from view, her fans were still enjoying the view. The beautiful backdrop included plenty of green trees and an abundance of sunshine.

    Looking So Good In Green

    Kim sported a green bathing suit that left little to the imagination. It featured a bandeau-style top with skinny straps that stretched tightly over her toned shoulders and arms. The piece was made of thick fabric, and it covered what was necessary to meet Instagram’s guidelines while still exposing a generous tease of cleavage. The tight fit of the garment helped draw more attention to the socialite’s chest.

    The KKW Beauty creator paired the look with a set of tiny bottoms that were equally as hot. The swimwear’s sides stretched up high, and the front dipped a few inches below her navel, and Kim’s abs and taut tummy were on full display. It had a sexy, high-rise design, displaying plenty of skin, and it also allowed the media personality to show off her shapely thighs and legs.

    She’s A Great SisterStars at the amfAR New York Gala 2019

    Stars at the amfAR New York Gala 2019

    MEGA

    Kim wore her dark brown hair straight and let the ends cascade over her shoulders and back. The billionaire also rocked a white-and-green cap, a merch from the 818 Tequila brand. Her look called for a small amount of bling, wearing a gold cross necklace and a belly chain. She opted to go barefoot for the photo op.

    In her caption, Kim described herself as a “supportive sister,” adding a cactus and the 818 numbers in emojis. Her fans were so in love with the brand-new share that they double-tapped the “like” button over 1.6 million times in just an hour after posting. An additional 8,500 social media users left comments.

    Here's a Breakdown of Taylor Swift's "All Too Well" Before We Get the 10-Minute Version

     


    Here's a Breakdown of Taylor Swift's "All Too Well" Before We Get the 10-Minute Version

    LOS ANGELES, CA - JANUARY 26: Taylor Swift performs onstage during the 56th GRAMMY Awards held at Staples Center on January 26, 2014 in Los Angeles, California. (Photo by Michael Tran/FilmMagic)

    Any Swiftie worth their salt knows that one of Taylor Swift's superpowers is her genius songwriting, and Red's "All Too Well" — a widely beloved track five song — is unquestionably one of her most monumental lyrical feats. When announcing her upcoming re-recorded album Red (Taylor's Version), Taylor hinted that she will include the 10-minute version of "All Too Well" that didn't make the cut on the original album. The 10-minute "All Too Well" is the stuff of Swiftian dreams, fantasies even, as fans have spent almost a decade wondering what else Taylor had to say to the boy who was so "casually cruel." It's not a mystery that the track was allegedly written about Jake Gyllenhaal, who Taylor dated from Oct. 2010 to Jan. 2011. When "All Too Well" first dropped in 2012, Jake, his sister Maggie Gyllenhaal, and one of Taylor's scarves became topics of intense public fascination. So we're pretty confident we know who the song is about, but what exactly is "All Too Well" about? Here's a thorough lyrical breakdown of this songwriting masterpiece — just be warned that listening to "All Too Well" on repeat has been known to cause heartbreak by proxy and a desperate yearning for autumn foliage.

    The song begins with the lyrics, "I walked through the door with you, the air was cold/But something 'bout it felt like home somehow." We get an image of Taylor and her lover going through a door together, which is also a metaphor for starting a relationship. Practically speaking, the cold air makes sense for the song's autumn setting, though it also represents the unfamiliar, as the pair transitioned from strangers to lovers. The following line mentions the infamous scarf that Taylor leaves behind while visiting her partner's sister — in this case, Maggie, who unfortunately has no idea what happened to the scarf.

    The first verse gives us glimpses into the history of their relationship as Taylor reflects on memories of "getting lost upstate" and "autumn leaves falling." Fall is the ballad's literal setting, but it also symbolizes the passionate yet fleeting relationship. As Taylor sings in "Red," the title track of the same album and a companion song to "All Too Well," loving that person was like "the colors in autumn, so bright, just before they lose it all."

    Building up to the chorus, Taylor reveals her feelings as she reflects back on the memories of her relationship, sining that she "might be OK," but she's "not fine at all." In the chorus, she shows where she got the song's title, repeating "I remember it all too well," which suggests that even though she wants to forget the relationship and move on, she can't shake off the vivid memories. Following the chorus, there's a verse about Taylor visiting her partner's family. She says, "We're singing in the car, getting lost upstate." This further points to Jake as the man she's singing about, since Jake himself claimed on Ellen that he always brings people to his mother's house on first dates.

    When we get to the bridge, Taylor's bittersweet tone shifts gears into more unbridled anger — she is the queen of bridges, after all. Taylor wonders if maybe they "got lost in translation" (a potential reference to the Sofia Coppola film, Lost in Translation) or maybe she "asked for too much." Ultimately, she decides that it was her partner's fault, that maybe their relationship was actually "a masterpiece" until he "tore it all up." Then comes the lines that Taylor herself is most proud of: "And you call me up again just to break me like a promise/so casually cruel in the name of being honest." Many speculate that Taylor is referring to the same call she mentions in "The Moment I Knew," in which she details a lover who doesn't show up to her birthday party. And guess who notably did not show up for her 21st birthday party? You guessed it: Jake.

    As the song winds down, Taylor sings about struggling to find herself again after the breakup. She details how her former lover mails back her things except for her scarf, singing, "'Cause it reminds you of innocence, and it smells like me." This line suggests that Taylor isn't the only person processing the relationship — he is too. She emphasizes this feeling of mutual mourning and struggling to move on towards the end, saying that her ex-lover also remembers it all too well.

    As grateful as we are to Taylor for blessing us with the original "All Too Well" and the impending 10-minute version, we're probably not ready for the emotional annihilation (and maybe tea spilling) that's bound to happen when Red (Taylor's Version) comes out. For now, we've got five minutes and 27 seconds of pure Swiftian artistry to enjoy, so we'll be over here listening on repeat. Read the full lyrics below:

    I walked through the door with you

    The air was cold

    But something 'bout it felt like home somehow

    And I, left my scarf there at your sister's house

    And you've still got it in your drawer even now

    Oh, your sweet disposition

    And my wide-eyed gaze

    We're singing in the car, getting lost upstate

    Autumn leaves falling down like pieces into place

    And I can picture it after all these days

    And I know it's long gone and that magic's not here no more

    And I might be okay but I'm not fine at all

    'Cause there we are again on that little town street

    You almost ran the red 'cause you were lookin' over at me

    Wind in my hair, I was there

    I remember it all too well

    Photo album on the counter

    Your cheeks were turning red

    You used to be a little kid with glasses in a twin-sized bed

    And your mother's telling stories 'bout you on the tee-ball team

    You told me 'bout your past thinking your future was me

    And I know it's long gone and there was nothing else I could do

    And I forget about you long enough to forget why I needed to

    'Cause there we are again in the middle of the night

    We're dancing 'round the kitchen in the refrigerator light

    Down the stairs, I was there

    I remember it all too well, yeah

    And maybe we got lost in translation

    Maybe I asked for too much

    But maybe this thing was a masterpiece 'til you tore it all up

    Running scared, I was there

    I remember it all too well

    And you call me up again just to break me like a promise

    So casually cruel in the name of being honest

    I'm a crumpled up piece of paper lying here

    'Cause I remember it all, all, all

    Too well

    Time won't fly, it's like I'm paralyzed by it

    I'd like to be my old self again

    But I'm still trying to find it

    After plaid shirt days and nights when you made me your own

    Now you mail back my things and I walk home alone

    But you keep my old scarf from that very first week

    'Cause it reminds you of innocence

    And it smells like me

    You can't get rid of it

    'Cause you remember it all too well, yeah

    'Cause there we are again when I loved you so

    Back before you lost the one real thing you've ever known

    It was rare, I was there, I remember it all too well

    Wind in my hair, you were there, you remember it all

    Down the stairs, you were there, you remember it all

    It was rare, I was there, I remember it all too well

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